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Previews for Scars of Mirrodin are in full swing, and the Wizards of the Coast employees are busy posting spoilers to Twitter.   Volition Reins was spoiled earlier today. There is an interesting sentence on this card; "When Volition Reins enters the battlefield, if enchanted permanent is tapped, untap it. " Seems overly complicated, doesn't it? Why not just write "When Volition Reins enters the battlefield, untap enchanted permanent?" The card has printed has what the Magic Comprehensive rules refer to as an intervening if clause. (This is rule 603. 4, in case someone were to ask you. . . ) "A triggered ability may read "When/Whenever/At [trigger event], if [condition], [effect]. " When the trigger event occurs, the ability checks whether the stated condition is true. The ability triggers only if it is; otherwise it does nothing. If the ability triggers, it checks the stated condition again as it resolves. If the condition isn't true at that time, the ability is removed from the stack and does nothing. Note that this mirrors the check for legal targets. This rule is referred to as the "intervening 'if' clause" rule. (The word "if" has only its normal English meaning anywhere else in the text of a card; this rule only applies to an "if" that immediately follows a trigger condition. )" An example of a commonly played card with an intervening if clause is Oath of Druids.   The clause on Oath means both that the ability will never be placed onto the stack if the condition is not true (less creatures than an opponent), and that the ability will be countered upon resolution if the condition is not true. So, what changes if Wizards of the Coast uses my proposed alternate simpler wording? The untap ability would be placed onto the stack every time Volition Reins hits the battlefield, whether the mount is tapped, untapped, flipped viagra premature, purple, or anything else. What happens, with the card as printed, when I cast Volition Reins targeting Jace, the Mind Sculptor? Barring some serious shenanigans, Jace will be untapped, and so you'll gain control of Jace with an empty stack. Planeswalkers are complicated, and there are a couple of commonly unknown or mistaken rules for them.   First, rule 606. 3, which states "A player may activate a loyalty ability of a permanent he or she controls any time he or she has priority and the stack is empty during a main phase of his or her turn, but only if no player has previously activated a loyalty ability of that permanent that turn. " (Planeswalker abilities, with those nifty numbers, are Loyalty abilities).   This rule is what clarifies that you can't use a Planeswalker at "instant speed, " a common simplification, but bis often overlooked or confused when dealing with triggered abilities. Secondly, rule 306. 7, which states "If noncombat damage would be dealt to a player by a source controlled by an opponent, that opponent may have that source deal that damage to a Planeswalker the first player controls instead. This is a redirection effect (see rule 614. 9) and is subject to the normal viagra premature rules for ordering replacement effects (see rule 616). The opponent chooses whether to redirect the damage as the redirection effect is applied. " In other words, you can't redirect your own Earthquake damage to your Chandra, and you can't Lightning Bolt your own Jace. Viagra [viagra premature] premature with my simplified wording, stealing a jace leaves me unable to activate him (as the stack is not empty) and vulnerable to having him destroyed by a spell like lightning bolt. With the wording as printed, there is never a point where I control Jace (in other words, a time when he's vulnerable to Lightning Bolt) and do not have the opportunity to activate one of his abilities. Wizards of the Coast is looking out for you slackers who haven't read the Comprehensive Rules. Lucky for you guys.

603. 4.  A triggered ability may read "When/Whenever/At [trigger event],  if [condition],  [effect]. " When the trigger event occurs,  the ability checks whether the stated condition is true.  The ability triggers only if it is; otherwise it does nothing.  If the ability triggers,  it checks the stated condition again as it resolves.  If the condition isn't true at that time,  the ability is removed from the stack and does nothing.  Note that this mirrors the check for legal targets.  This rule is referred to as the "intervening 'if' clause" rule.  (The word "if" has only its normal English meaning anywhere else in the text of a card; this rule only applies to an "if" that immediately follows a trigger condition. )


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