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Allegedly, Matt Nass was behind on board position in game 2, facing down lethal damage from a pair of Hell's Thunders. At this point, Mat called a judge and asked for his opponent's deck to be checked for marked cards. A pattern of marking was found, and a game loss was assigned. So, did Matt do anything wrong? Let's assume for one scenario that winning the game at hand did not occur as a motivation for Matt's actions. Viagra indigestion as a side effect best price, fast delivery in this case, he called a judge as soon as he saw a fourth copy of a unique card with the same pattern; a curling common to foils. If the potential cheating that Matt witnessed were of viagra indigestion as a side effect best price, fast delivery a different sort, would the public outcry be as loud? What if Matt witnessed his opponent slip a card to the top of his deck while shuffling? In this instance, no one would fault him for calling a judge, and it's very doubtful that anyone could fault him for not calling a judge the first one, two, or three times that his opponents shuffled and presented. A violation of the rules should be treated the [viagra indigestion as a side effect best price, fast delivery] same regardless of what it is, with summoning a judge. It is entirely unreasonable to fault Matt for not doing so for the first few copies of the card, as it appears evident that he did so as soon as he noticed a problem. And if Matt did intend for the result of this judge call to be a game loss? If he was "fishing for a win?" It doesn't matter viagra indigestion as a side effect best price, fast delivery, as his opponent was breaking the rules. The judges at the event determined that there was a pattern of marked cards, and assigned a penalty based on that. Is it also fishing for a win if you call a judge after your opponent say's "Look, a distraction!" and draws an extra card? (To those of you who go beyond this to imply that the judges involved were prejudiced in Matt's favor. . . I find this both insulting and idiotic. I hope more need not be said). What if, for the sake of argument, Matt had noticed the potential of marked cards and ad chosen to be a "nice guy" and not call a judge? The floor rules for the game are very clear on this; Matt would be cheating, and subject to a disqualification at the very least. Being nice or mean to his opponent simply doesn't enter into the consideration. MAtt did the absolute only thing that he could do to protect himself under the rules of the event. If you notice an opponent draw an extra card, miss a trigger, or any of several other common rules mistakes, your responsibility is to call a judge. Offering or trying to fix things yourself is, bluntly, cheating. Don't do it. Matt won a large event recently. Has that changed his attitude towards that game? Absolutely. He is more focused, more committed to winning future events. He is also more aware of his responsibilities as a player. This scenario, as much as some folks would like the think otherwise, ultimately comes from a desire to follow the rules rather than break them.


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