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I've always had a problem with racism.   Not the traditional problem of a moral objection to it, although that is certainly present.   No, I've just always had problems understanding the motivation behind it. There are plenty of reasons to feel superior to any given person without having to resort to reason beyond personal control. Perhaps this is another attitude that I have my father to thank for.   If all of the world is made up of marks, then all of the world is poker viagra, in a very twisted sense, equal.   I can think of no time that racism was present in my childhood home.   Neither the overt kind, with words full of hate and fear, nor the subtle kind, with social groups and turned noses and phrases like "those people. "  Not once. Or perhaps it was because I grew up in, for lack of a better term, melting pot communities.   Southern California has a steady inward flow of people from all walks of life, not just from this country but from others as well.   Small town girls looking to be the next Hollywood star.   High school grads looking for the slacker surfer school.   People crossing a border, or an ocean, or an entire world, looking for a place just like they see in the movies.   Everyone chasing a dream. And within that community, most of my time growing up was spent at college.   My after-school programs were playing pool with the pool sharks, discussing the relative merits of Monopoly over Acquire with the Economics majors, and drinking in the atmosphere and attitudes of the best and the brightest minds. Bigotry comes from fear and ignorance, so what hold would it have on someone who's life is devoted to the pursuit of knowledge, to bravely digging into the dark of the world and of man's souls. When she was in the poker viagra wee years of her life, my sister was asked to describe someone in detail.   After going into height, weight, hair, eyes, attitude, accents and phrases, and so on, she was asked what color he was.   "Oh. Tan, but not to tan.   Like the start of summer tan. "  There was simply no framework present for that sort of nastiness in my childhood. But time passed, and I went to public school.   And here I learned about racism.   I still didn't understand it, but I certainly witnessed it.   Social groups, scorn, and separation.   And time further passed, and I understood it more and more. I understood that it is an appalling attitude, and not at all to be coddled.   But the way to defeat it is not to force it away, or into the corner.   Certainly not to try to rename it, to remake it into something else. Equal Opportunity programs, as well-intentioned as they might be, are as racist as segregation.   I understood that it comes from fear, and uncertainty, and dismay. But fear is often illogical, and presenting it with a logical solution [poker viagra] seldom helps. I came to understand that there is nothing natural about it.   Left to my own devices, and shown nothing of it, I did not naturally come to understand that certain "races" were  naturally superior.   There was no universal knowledge that I stumbled upon, no inherent aversion.   Instead, I came upon this attitude through contact with others who had it.   I came to understand that it is a disease. And so, armed with my new found wisdom, I sought to enlighten the world.   Do you hate those who catch a cold?  Do you shun those with cancer?  Certainly not.   You shelter them, nurse them, support them, until they become well. Then should not the same be true with this disease?  Support the afflicted, nurse them, until they are better. Of course the treatments won't be the same.   Bundling someone up in a blanket and feeding them Chicken Noodle soup will do little to change their attitudes.   But just as one does not coddle a fever, one should never ever support, or even indulge, these sick attitudes.   Show not one bit of tolerance for racist remarks or actions, while always, always cherishing the afflicted. My revelation was greeted with much scorn.   Not just from one group, or even one side of the issue.   No, most everyone seemed oblivious to my insistence, to my hope for change. And here is where I truly, fully understood what racism is.   Racism is born of fear.   Fear that you are inferior, that you simply don't measure up.   Fear that you will be judged, and you will be found lesser for it.   But those folk who protested most heartily against racism?  They, too, were just as afraid.   Afraid that by being quiet they too would be judged. Judged to be not zealous enough, and therefore to be lesser. And here too I finally understood how easy it would be for me to walk down the path of an unrighteous man.   Fear is a strong force, able to drive little men to great deeds and great men to little deeds. Poker viagra   and if everyone else is afraid, then everyone else is equal, in a sense.   And equally able to be used. Scared, and dismayed, I placed my wisdom on the shelf.   Still true, still right, but hidden away nonetheless.


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