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Noted Magic: the Gathering Financier ( on Twitter) asked recently "How should stores with small FTV allocations handle selling them?"  It's a good question, even if Kelly didn't realize that every store is a store with a small allocation (the largest number a store can receive is 18 copies). There are several valid options: You can sell the boxes as is, sealed product. You can bust the boxes and sell the cards as singles. You can raffle them off. You can auction them off. Or you can award then as event prizes. If you're selling the boxes sealed, you need to decide both on price and on distribution. Distribution defines price in this instance, so let's figure out who we'll sell them to before we figure out how much we'll sell them for.   Demand will be high for the product, and you'll have at most 18 copies to sell.   You could simply sell them on a first-come, first-served basis.   If you do this, your price point can be whereever you want to put it - below $60, and the first rational customer will buy all of them (as SCG is offering $60 to buy the set), above $200 probably won't sell a copy, and the closer to $60 the price is that faster the product will sell out.   You can also restrict sales of the set based upon something like customer loyalty or even random chance.   Having each customer who wants a copy drop a name in a hat, and offering the pulled names first option to buy,  means that those unfortunate gamers who are working at the start of business on August 27th will have as much chance to get a copy as the unemployed college kids.   This method allows you to still price the set at whatever point you'd like, as the randomly selected customers will still have the option not to buy at your chosen price point.   This method also has the benefit of not risking offending your 9-5 employed customers, who realisitically spend more money in your store than the customers you'd expect to be there at opening.   You can also grant customers first shot at purchasing the box by rewardig loyalty.   There are nigh onto infinite ways to do this, but the most likely way would be to award each customer points based upon how much money they spend, how many events they attend, or both. The customers with the most accrued loyalty points would then have first option to purchase the set. (If you do go with rewarding loyalty, keep ongoing totals.  Customers will likely view it as more fair if their loyalty is judged over a long term, rahter than the two weeks before a limited edition set comes out.   You can also allocate other limited products uding this system, whether for MtG or some other system. ) If you're a dedicated Magic store, you might want to consider splitting up the boxes and selling the cards as singles.   The cards from the set see play in Legacy and EDH, not Standard, so this is a risky move if you don't have a sufficient discount canadian cialis player base in those formats.   However, selling the sets as singles means that an aggressively low price is able to sell out even faster than if you were selling boxed sets, as players will be more willing to spend cash on only the card(s) they need.   There is also a greater potential for profit here, as the collection of cards in their previous versions is about $125 market value right now, and a fair price would include a premium above that for the foiling and the alternate art. Breaking all of the boxes for the store also helps to avoied any concerns over favoritism or grumpiness from customers who were unable to buy a sealed copy (if one were to sell that route). Of course, if you're going to all that trouble filling out tickets and dropping names in hats, you might want to consider fust giving the sets away to the raffle winners.   If you're rewarding customers with, say one ticket per $5 spent and one ticket per event attended, then giving away a copy or two to raffle winners can be viewed as a discount on monies already earmarked for your store, rather than a loss in potential profit.  If you wanted to, you could even let customers buy additional tickets for, say, $1 each.   You're not likely to have many people buying rolls of tickets, but an extra 20 people picking up a ticket with their purchase as an impulse is an extra $20 in the till, and it makes for a good spot for an advertisement or newsletter.   You could even auction the boxes off, selling your copies only to the highest bidder.   However, I'd recommend against the auction method, either silent or live, as my personal feeling is that it's likely to both not draw as many potential buyers as other methods and to cause upset feelings with those buyers who do participate. Finally, the box sets can be given away themselves as prizes.   Most major MtG events in the coming months will have a public event with a FtV [discount canadian cialis] Relics box for first place.   ChannelFireball also makes a habit of holding several weekend events where top finishers receive a set. Discount canadian cialis   this method is a great way to drive interest and attendance in your events discount canadian cialis, but really only works well if you have the population base to draw from. (GPs and Pro Tours have players flying in from other areas, and CFB has a local population of 13. 5 million people. )  You can also give out the set as a door prize at a major event, or to the player who accumulates the most match wins over a period of time, like the StarCityGames Open Series is doing with their Power 9 prize. However you do decide to distribute them, you'll likely run into customers complaining about your failure to simply sell them for MSRP.   Although there's a large body of argument to be done on that topic, my favorite response to these complaints is to inform the customer that you'll gladly discount a FTV box to MSRP if they also buy a Booster Box at MSRP, and then watch their jaws dangle. Happy selling.


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